Vegetables

Tomato

Tomato, a pulpy nutritious fruit commonly eaten as a vegetable, is another wonderful gift of the Mayans to the world. A pulpy nutritious fruit commonly eaten as a vegetable, is another wonderful gift

Aubergines (Eggplant)

Eggplant, also known as aubergine, is a flowering plant that belongs to the nightshade family. It originates from China. Cultivation of eggplant started 600 years BC in southern and eastern parts of Asia. There are around 770 varieties of eggplant that can be found in tropical and sub-tropical areas around the world. People cultivate eggplant as a source of food. Other than that, eggplant can be cultivated as ornamental plant.

Beans

Because of their rich green color, we don’t always think about green beans as providing us with important amounts of colorful pigments like carotenoids. But they do! Recent studies have confirmed the presence of lutein, beta-carotene, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin in green beans. In some cases, the presence of these carotenoids in green beans is comparable to their presence in other carotenoid-rich vegetables like carrots and tomatoes. The only reason we don’t see these carotenoids is because of the concentrated chlorophyll content of green beans and the amazing shades of green that it provides.

 

 

Varieties

Beans BroadBeans RunnerBeans Fine
Broccoli

It is a very good source of dietary fiber, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin E, manganese, phosphorus, choline, vitamin B1, vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids), potassium and copper. Broccoli is also a good source of vitamin B1, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, protein, zinc, calcium, iron, niacin and selenium.

Varieties

Local BroccoliSpain Broccoli
Cauliflower

Cauliflower belongs to the group of cruciferous vegetables, also known as family of cabbages. It is closely related to broccoli, brussels sprouts, kale and cabbage. Cauliflower originates from Asia Minor. Cultivation of cauliflower started 600 years B.C. in Turkey. Cauliflower gained popularity in Europe in the 16th century, while cultivation in America started at the beginning of the 20th century. Cauliflower requires slightly acidic, clay-like soil that is rich in minerals and regular watering for successful growth. Hundreds varieties of cauliflower are available today. They differ in color, size, shape, taste and nutritional composition. Cauliflower has high nutritional value and it is known as one of the healthiest plants on the planet.

Peppers (Green/Red/Yellow/Orange/Mix)

A wonderful combination of tangy taste and crunchy texture, sweet bell peppers are the Christmas ornaments of the vegetable world with their beautifully shaped glossy exterior that comes in a wide array of vivid colors ranging from green, red, yellow, orange, purple, brown to black. Despite their varied palette, all are the same plant, known scientifically as Capsicum annuum. They are members of the nightshade family, which also includes potatoes, tomatoes and eggplant. Sweet peppers are plump, bell-shaped vegetables featuring either three or four lobes. Green and purple peppers have a slightly bitter flavor, while the red, orange and yellows are sweeter and almost fruity. Paprika can be prepared from red bell peppers (as well as from chili peppers). Bell peppers are not ‘hot’. The primary substance that controls “hotness” in peppers is called capsaicin, and it’s found in very small amounts in bell peppers.

Okra

Also referred to as lady’s finger and gumbo, Okra is a nutritional powerhouse used throughout history for both medicinal and culinary purposes. Once loved by the Egyptians and still used in many dishes today (such as the infamous gumbo dish), this pod-producing, tropical vegetable dates back over 3500 years ago. But still today, many are enjoying both okra health benefits and the vegetable’s edible delight. Okra is known for it’s high vitamin C, vitamin K, and folate content. Further, okra is known for harnessing a superior fiber, which helps with digestion, stabilizes blood sugar, and helps to control the rate at which sugar is absorbed.

Chilly

Chilly also called Chili, chile, chilly, chily, Mirchi, chile pepper, Aji, Paprika. When landed in South America, Columbus discovered chilly and mistook it for pepper, naming it “Chile Pepper.” Chilly was used from 7000 BC in Mexico and was cultivated from 3500 BC.

Lemon

Lemon is an evergreen plant that belongs to the family Rutaceae. It originates from Asia, but it can be found in tropical and sub-tropical regions throughout the world today. Cultivation of lemon started in the first century AD. Lemon is important part of human diet, but it has numerous other, equally valuable properties. Lemon is used in pharmaceutical industry, in the food processing, in the cosmetic industry, for the production of perfumes and in the manufacture of cleansing products. Lemon is a staple food on the ships around the world because it prevents scurvy (disease that results from lack of vitamin C in a diet).

Carrot

Carrots are an excellent source of beta-carotene, and contain high amount of fiber. Beta carotene is important for eyesight, skin health, and normal growth.

Carrots are a good source of fiber, vitamin C and potassium, as well as vitamin B6, folate, and several minerals including calcium and magnesium.

Carrots have a higher natural sugar content than all other vegetables with the exception of beets. This is why they make a wonderful snack when eaten raw and make a tasty addition to a variety of cooked dishes.

Onions

Onions were historically as a preventative medicine during epidemics of cholera and the plague. They were apparently eaten by Roman emperor Nero as a cure for colds, and its reputation has made onions a popular component in the diets of many countries.

More than just a tasty culinary plant, the onion contains natural sugar, vitamins A, B6, C and E, minerals such as sodium, potassium, iron and dietry fibre. In addition, onions are a good source of folic acid.

Potato

The potato goes back in time—way back to native tribes in the Andes almost 10,000 years ago. And today, Peru is the potato capital of the world, with amazing diversity in potatoes. There you’ll find them in all shapes, sizes and colors imaginable. The earliest farming of potatoes, however, began in about 1400 BC in the same region. Thanks to their hardiness, potatoes were a great crop in the mountainous regions of Peru, where wheat and corn could not thrive.

In about 1570, the Spanish brought potatoes back to Europe. Sailors loved them for their protection again scurvy (thanks to their high vitamin C content) and back in their homeland, they took off like wild-fire and become a low-cost staple for people everywhere.

Celery

Celery is one of popular Mediterranean herbs recognized for its strong aromatic flavor that it imparts to variety of cuisines. It is a small biennial herbaceous plant originated in Europe. It can be grown easily as a potherb in the home-gardens for its flavorful leaves, shoots, roots, and seeds.

Botanically, celery belongs to the family of Apiaceae, in the genus; Apium, and known scientifically as Apium graveolens.

It is a small plant; reaching about half a meter in height and requires fertile, moisture rich soil to flourish.

Celery herb bears umbelliform flowers at the top of the stalk in the second year. Edible cluster of long, dark-green, somewhat hollow stalks grow upright from the crown of the plant. Its leaves have similar appearance to that of flat-leaf parsley.

Pumpkin

A pumpkin is a cultivar of a squash plant, most commonly of Cucurbita pepo, that is round, with smooth, slightly ribbed skin, and deep yellow to orange coloration. The thick shell contains the seeds and pulp. Some exceptionally large cultivars of squash with similar appearance have also been derived from Cucurbita maxima. Specific cultivars of winter squash derived from other species, including C. argyrosperma, and C. moschata, are also sometimes called “pumpkin”. In New Zealand and Australian English, the term pumpkin generally refers to the broader category called winter squash elsewhere.

Cabbage

Cabbage is high in fiber, vitamin C & K, and naturally fat free and cholesterol free. Different varieties of cabbages have varying nutritional strength: purple cabbage has more vitamin C, while the savoy has more vitamin A, calcium, iron and potassium. Cabbages are an excellent source of fiber and vitamin K, and a good source of vitamin C, calcium, pottasium, and magnesium.

Cabbage is one of the oldest vegetables in existence and continues to be a dietary staple throughout the world. It is a nutritional powerhouse that is an excellent source of manganese, vitamin B6, and folate; and a good source of thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, potassium, vitamin A, tryptophan, protein and magnesium. It has virtually no fat. One cup of shredded raw cabbage contains 50 calories and 5 grams of dietary fiber. It can be steamed, boiled, braised, microwaved, stuffed, or stir-fried, and eaten raw.

Varieties

Cabbage PrimoChinese CabbageCabbage SavoyRed Cabbage
Courgettes (Zucchini)

Zucchini is one of the very low calorie vegetables; provide only 17 calories per 100 g. It contains no saturated fats or cholesterol. Its peel is good source of dietary fiber that helps reduce constipation and offers some protection against colon cancers. Furthermore, zucchinis, especially golden skin varieties, are rich in flavonoid poly-phenolic antioxidants such as carotenes, lutein and zea-xanthin. These compounds help scavenge harmful oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the body that play a role in aging and various disease processes.

Marrow (Koosa)

Some of the most important health benefits include its ability to prevent certain types of cancer, lower cholesterol, protect against diabetes, lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, help in weight loss efforts, boost eye health, build strong bones, improve energy levels and circulation, and increase the health and responsiveness of the immune system.

Ginger
Ginger: Of the 115 different chemical components found in ginger root, the therapeutic benefits come from gingerols, the oily resin from the root that acts as a highly potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. These bioactive ingredients, especially gingerol, have been thoroughly evaluated clinically, and the research backs up why you should use ginger on a regular basis.
 
Cucumbers

Cucumbers are scientifically known as Cucumis sativus and belong to the same botanical family as melons (including watermelon and cantaloupe) and squashes (including summer squash, winter squash, zucchini and pumpkin). Commercial production of cucumbers is usually divided into two types. “Slicing cucumbers” are produced for fresh consumption. “Pickling cucumbers” are produced for eventual processing into pickles. Slicing cucumbers are usually larger and have thicker skins, while pickling cucumbers are usually smaller and have thinner skins.

Lettuce

Lettuce is one of poular green leafy-vegetables. Its crispy, green/crimson-red leaves are one of the incredible sources of essential nutrients that benefit health. Indeed, it is among the most sought-after greens, be it in your crunchy green salads or healthy sandwiches!

Lettuce leaves exude milk-like fluid (sap) when cut, and hence its name derived from Latin lactuca for milk. Botanically this marvelous, nutrition rich leafy green belongs to the daisy family of Asteraceae. Scientific name: Lactuca sativa. Lactuca sativa is a small size annual plant that flourishes well under sandy, humus soil. There are about six varieties of cultivars exist based upon their head formation and leaf structure. Leaf varieties with more bitter taste are rather rich in nutrients as well as antioxidants.

Varieties

Lettuce FriseeLettuce IceburgLettuce Lollo RossoLettuce OakleafLettuce Round
Radish

Radish: Offering a peppery, satisfying crunch with every bite, radishes have a unique place in the hearts of veggie lovers. A root from the Brassica family and a cousin to cabbage, the many shapes, sizes and colors of different radish varieties is surprising.

The average large radish is red, round with a glistening white interior and roughly the size of a ping pong or golf ball. Another type is the creamy white daikon – a true tuber with the tail to show for it, and a winter radish, while the red ones proliferate in the spring. The original radish was black. Other varieties come in pink, dark grey, purple, two-tone green and white, and yellow.

The radish is well-traveled and ancient, mentioned in historical Chinese annals as early as 2,700 B.C. Egyptians cultivated them even before building the pyramids. Greeks and Romans liked them as large as they would grow, and served them with honey and vinegar. Radish cultivation reached England, Germany, Mexico, and Puerto Rico by the 1500s. In Britain, radishes had medicinal as well as culinary uses, usually for kidney stones, bad skin, and intestinal worms. It may have worked, because the colonists brought radish seeds with them to the New World.